WIRED, Edgewell Personal Care & Chevrolet Let Emojis Poke Some Fun into Business as Usual

Most of us probably interact with at least one emoji a day. We see them in our private text messages, personal emails and now they’re a meaningful part of the greater media machine that saturates modern life.

Emojis have been creeping their way into our mediated communication steadily over the past decade. Creator, Shigetaka Kurati invented them as an easy way for cell phone users to communicate sentiment. He was looking for a way to make expression of feelings more simple and direct. This was similar to the shortcodes people used on pagers. Remember 07734, turned upside down (looks like hello!) ?

hello

Emojis now show up in consumer goods commercials and even on the cover of magazines. WIRED magazine’s cover, a 2016 Finalist in the ASME’s best cover contest – Brainest category –  featured one simple emoji and a few dots.

wi0315_cover-1

The magazine said of its cover:

“Creating a cover for WIRED’s first Sex Issue was a delicate task. We spent many months crafting balanced and thought-provoking editorial for the issue, which touched on all aspects of sexuality through a WIRED lens. But coming up with a singular image to represent this breadth of content was a challenge, and we went through nearly 50 cover options, ranging from sexy to scientific to quirky to safe. Ultimately, we arrived at the most WIRED cover possible: the emoji for sex, followed by the three dots of anticipation.”

An ad released last month by Edgewell Personal Care, the owners of Schick® & Skintimate®, brought emojis to life by depicting some of the most common emojis by actors in this music video-esque spot.

So, not only are we seeing more emojis in general but new expressions of them in conjuction with more traditional media/advertising formats. See the Chevy Cruze’s use of emojis in this common ad scenario – real people (not actors) try it.

Some find emojis integrated into advertising to be insulting. Yet, more Google searches including ’emoji’ are occurring now than they have in the last five years prior.